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Hey guys,

This issue came up a couple of times in two separate offices this week and every time it did I had to scratch my head and re-figure it out, even though I think I kinda knew it from before. I hope this post is helpful to people with the same predicament but I also hope that I will finally engrave the solution deep into my brain by writing it into a blog post. Here we go.

Problem.

Window displays wrong when cut in Plan view, adjusting View Range has no effect.

This can often occur with a full-height double-pane windows with an openable upper part, for example. The window might look like this when this happens.

Solution.

The actual solution can be found in this Autodesk Troubleshooting page, but there are a few tricky moments when following the recipe given in the text. Here is what the suggested solution looks like according to Autodesk:

  1. Edit the family.
  2. Go to the Ref Level.
  3. In the View Properties edit the View Range.
  4. Set the desired value for the Cut Plane.
  5. Load the updated family into the project.
  6. Verify that the appearance of the family is updated.

The first part of the solution is to conceptually grasp the fact that you cannot do anything inside of the Project – everything is done inside the actual Family! This can be really confusing because, well just because View Ranges are really confusing to begin with. And so you might be thinking “Gosh, what did I screw up this time, I’m cutting in the correct level yet I am getting this weird window. I can see that all the parts of the window are there when I tab/select it but it simply doesn’t want to show! “£*”!%&&!” And you would be correct! You’ve done everything right within the Project, but you have to head to the Window Family in order to make this work.

We are now editing the family and getting to point #2 – Go to the Ref Level. The tricky bit here is figuring out what the hell is the Ref Level and how to go there – the Ref Level is the Family equivalent of the Project floor level and you select it like so:

and then you will be able to change the View Range:

Adjust the cutting plane so it goes through all the bits that need to be displayed.

And there you have it. Load the Family back into the Project and it should work fine. It is a bit controversial but I guess, like all things in Revit, someone must have had a reason to create this functionality.

Now go cut your Window like it was meant to be cut! Oh, and that works for Doors too. Cheers, folks! (I’m literarily having a Cider right now)

Greetings, folks!

Here is a quick solution to an inconvenience I was having when setting up some Window Legend sheets today. In this particular case I’ve decided to use the Phased Out Legends approach discussed many years ago in this blog post by Martijn de Riet. This is from 2012 but it’s still a valid approach in my opinion. We’ve enjoyed quite a few treats in the recent years, sadly Legends are still to get the attention they need.

The premise is that you setup your Window views as plain old Plan and Elevation views using one long long wall containing all your window types. In order to hide that in all your normal views, you place this rig inside the ‘Existing’ phase and you also demolish them in that same phase. Then you simply adjust your views to show said phases correctly. These dummy windows would remain hidden in all normal views including schedules. That’s the gist of it.

I bet there were a number of ways to automate the task of creating all the ‘mini views’ for each window type, but what I found myself doing is duplicating the same plan and elevation view as dependant views, adjusting the crop region as needed and placing them on the appropriate sheet. Tedious, tedious work.

Duplicate Views on Sheets

What came out of my frustration was a neat way to duplicate Views on Sheets. I can see how that can be quite handy in so many situations where you simply want to save some of the hustle of all the duplicating and dragging and dropping. So here you go, folks, a nice little Macro that you can use inside your Application Macros straight away (unless you need Administrative rights in which case you can go and kick your IT’s butt from me).


// Use inside the Application Macros
public void DuplicateViewPort()
{
	Document doc = this.ActiveUIDocument.Document;			
				
	Viewport viewportToDuplicate = ViewportToDuplicateFromSelection(this.ActiveUIDocument);
	View viewToDuplicate = ViewToDuplicate(doc, viewportToDuplicate);
	XYZ placementPoint = viewportToDuplicate.GetBoxOutline().MaximumPoint;
	using(Transaction t = new Transaction(doc, "dulicate viewport"))
	{
		t.Start();
		Viewport.Create(doc, viewportToDuplicate.SheetId, viewToDuplicate.Id, placementPoint);				
		t.Commit();
	}
}
// Returns the Selected Viewport to Duplicate - promps for selection
internal Viewport ViewportToDuplicateFromSelection(UIDocument uidoc)
{
	var selectedViewPort = uidoc.Selection.PickObject(ObjectType.Element, "Pick Viewport");						
	var viewport = uidoc.Document.GetElement(selectedViewPort.ElementId) as Viewport;
							
	return viewport;
}
// Returns the duplicate View to be placed on the Sheet
internal View ViewToDuplicate(Document doc, Viewport viewport)
{
	using(Transaction t = new Transaction(doc, "duplicate view"))
	{
		t.Start();	
		var view = doc.GetElement(viewport.ViewId) as View;				
		var duplicateView = doc.GetElement(view.Duplicate(ViewDuplicateOption.AsDependent)) 
                   as Autodesk.Revit.DB.View;
		t.Commit();
		
		return duplicateView;
	}			
}

Feel free to use it as you see fit. Ask away, if you have issues implementing it. Use the code to create Dynamo nodes of any sort or kind and generally knock yourselves out.

The wait is over and Warchart is available for download from Autodesk App Store – go right ahead and get your fresh copy of our new product and start cleaning those pesky Warnings, enjoying yourself every step of the way!

Ok, you might be thinking – wait, whatchart? Warwho? Alright, let’s take it one step at a time.

History of Revit Warnings

Warnings have always been a part of Revit’s grunt. Their existence is important in two ways.

First and probably most important, Revit is doing you a great service in telling you that something is wrong with your model. Understanding Revit Warnings, in Autodesk’s own words, is important and you would want to prioritize those areas in your project where you might be punished later down the road – for example, having “Duplicate Instances in the Same Place” might result in a misleading schedule – not ideal.

Hint: clear Warnings which lead to program implications first.

The second way in which accumulating Revit Warnings should be of interest to you is because it directly affects Model Performance. Yup, every character is a byte of information and it just adds up, slowing your model in the process. There is no hard limit as to how many Warnings is a definite no-no – I bet my BIM hat that everyone has their own opinion, my

Hint: let’s say Warning Number = N and File Size in MB = S. Then:

  • Wow: N = 0
  • Good: N < S
  • Alright: N < 2 x S
  • Poor: N < 4 x S

For example, if you have a model of 350mb, you can tap yourself on the shoulder at 350 Warnings, go ‘meh’ at 700 and feel bad about yourself at 1400. Each project is different and those values will vary.

Let’s see what Autodesk has to say:

“Ideally, all warnings should be addressed and the total number of unresolved warnings should be zero. But in reality, this is a tall order in most projects. So the pragmatic approach is to resolve as many of the warnings that you reasonably can.”

User Interface (UI)

Revit provides you with a simple but thorough UI to let you go through the different Warnings in your Model. While it has everything that’s needed to get the job done, I feel that the main problem the community has had with the default Warning Dialogue was the difficulty with which you navigate and isolate the affected elements.

 

After Autodesk Development Team released the Document.GetWarnings() method a number of community created alternatives came to live each attempting to give a better way of dealing with Warnings. In all fairness, the process started even before Revit 2018, but the extra step of having to export and parse an .html file made those solutions a bit .. uglier I guess is the word. GetWarnings() created a really elegant way of interacting with what was already inside Revit.

Enter Warchart

Warchart stands for Warning (Pie) Chart. The great thing about Warchart is that it builds on the fluidity of this new feature. It’s absolutely adorably interactive. It gives you an immediate feedback. That’s a really powerful feature and we can talk about gamification, dopamine release all we want but the fact of the matter is that it’s just super cool watching you eating through those Warnings like the proverbial Pacman (see what I did there?). A part of this, of course, is the Modeless WPF which allows you to keep Warchart open while you go about your business.

The other really potent feature is the ability to zero on those warnings which matter the most – because the interface is actually one big colorful pie-chart, you know the distribution of Warnings in your project immediately.

To give you a taste of what Warchart looks and feels like, here are a couple of screenshots from it.

 

 

 

Download Now!

With Warchart you can have your Pie and eat it too! Actually, I’m not entirely sure how applicable to Warchart this saying is, but we do have a tasty-looking image of a Pie so I couldn’t resist.

If you are burning with excitement like we do, head to the App Store and download Warchart! You’ll see how much more enjoyable your model management becomes with this intuitive and easy to use gem of a Plugin.

I hope you like our new release. If you have any questions about it or ideas on how to improve it, drop us a line – we’d love your feedback and we’d appreciate your time!

 

Here in Archilizer we are proud geeks! We love a bit of scripting, and a handsome spreadsheet – data speaks to us. Just give us a crisp set of algorithms on a Monday morning and we will break them and fix them by noon.

But we also remember our humble beginnings in design. We know that visualized data is worth a thousand words, so we always strive to optimize how we view those seductive masses of information we are constantly showered with. Say for instance, Warnings in Revit – nobody wants to deal with them – it is such a hassle to figure out where to start from and what is important and what is just Revit being a Diva. So we created a plugin to clean all that into a neat pie chart with built in functionality to help you get that thrilling satisfaction of reducing your Warnings!

The plugin analyses the types of warnings, presents them in a minimalist way, so you can select what you are most interested in, or what seems to be the widest spread issue and isolate it, so you can investigate and fix.

Warchart is going through final approvals by Autodesk and will be available on the Autodesk App Store soon – watch this space.

Here are some videos showing off our new little gem:

 

 

 

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